Publications

  • Low-Energy City Policy Handbook

    Energy Cities

    This handbook is aimed at decision makers in European local authorities searching for new ways to work towards achieving low energy cities. It is intended to give inspiration and practical advice to elected political leaders as well as civil servants to run their own energy transition process at the local level. 

    TOPICS
  • Energy Cities - A to Z local government

    Energy Cities

    This publication invites you to discover the multiple facets of a collaborative city from A-Z, based on our over 25 years’experience of what works well in Europe.The list is, of course, not exhaustive as the beauty of energy transition is the wide and unlimited field of possibilities that it opens up! What it is proposing however is a change of perspective. As the energy landscape is undergoing radical change, from a once hierarchical and monopolistic system to a more distributed and decentralised one, so too should the decision-making architecture. Indeed, a new system cannot be designed using outdated models: in writing a new chapter of our history, we must also empower its new stakeholders. We, the local and regional actors, are these new players, through the role we play in mobilizing civil society and SMEs, tapping into the large array of dispersed renewable or locally recovered energy sources and increasing energy savings and efficiency through ambitious building, urban planning and mobility strategies. This publication complements Energy Cities’ “30 proposals for the energy transition of cities” with its many case studies.

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  • Corruption in the construction of public infrastructure: critical issues in project preparation

    CMI U4

    This paper seeks to strengthen understanding of the processes that govern the selection and preparation of construction projects for public investment - the first two stages presented in figure 1. It also explores how additional opportunities for corruption arise and projects fail to meet their objectives when the initial selection and preparation process is compromised. The paper argues that the two most harmful forms of corruption identified by Kenny (2006, 2009a) are linked: skewed incentives that lead to the selection of poor projects at the project appraisal and budgeting stage can have a major impact on the subsequent stages of project implementation and, ultimately, on the value of the project.

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  • Mixed incentives: Adopting ICT innovations for transparency, accountability, and anti-corruption

    CMI U4

    In this issue paper we consider the reasons that may lead governments to adopt anti-corruption-related ICT  innovations,  and  we  look  at  the  evidence  on  how  the  uptake  and  use  of these  ICTs  may  affect their impacts. In doing so, we draw upon literature from a range of fields, including open government, anti-corruption,  e-government,  and  technology  for  transparency,  and  speculate  based  on  our  own observations of the open government field over the last five years. To ground our argument, we offer a  range  of  illustrative  case  studies  that  show  some  of  the  different  kinds  of  ICT  interventions  with which governments are engaged.

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  • Smart City Framework - A Systematic Process for Enabling Smart+Connected Communities

    CISCO

    The Smart City Framework proposed in this paper describes a process that will help key stakeholders and city/community participants 1) understand how cities operate, 2) define city objectives and stakeholder roles, and 3) understand the role of ICT within physical city assets.